Services

Services

Sectors

Home

8th June 2018



Other Stories – 8th June 2018

Another busy week has passed – in case you missed them here are some of the stories that caught our eye, including 103-year-old chocolate, the Macarena and a long lost Van Gogh …

Photo: Ele.me

£20 painting could be a long lost Van Gogh. A £20 painting that had been hanging in the home of a Thai singer for six years is now thought to be a priceless lost Van Gogh. The painting, bought from an antiques shop in Bangkok, was thought to be a cheap fake until it was examined by a specialist art historian. If confirmed by Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum as real, the painting could sell for tens of millions. The Mirror

FTSE 100 CEOs are more likely to be called John than be a woman. A report has found that with just seven female FTSE 100 CEOs, there’s a higher chance of the UK’s largest companies being headed by a man called John than a woman. The government backed Hampton-Alexander review has set a target of 33% women on FTSE 100 leadership teams by 2020, to try and increase female representation in senior positions. Currently, just 19.3% of FTSE 100 board positions are held by women. Cips.org

Food delivery drones introduced in Shanghai. Shanghai will be the first city to begin food delivery by drone, with takeaway service Ele.me covering 17 routes across Jinshan Industrial Park. Within 20 minutes of placing their order, customers will receive their flying food from over 100 different restaurants. The new method is thought to be a much cheaper alternative to normal road deliveries. BBC News

Scientists make breakthrough that could end tooth decay. Researchers at Queen Mary University have stumbled across a possible method for treating sensitive and decaying teeth. A new protein that can grow crystals has been discovered and scientists hope it could be used to repair precious tooth enamel and bone. As tooth enamel is unable to repair itself, the discovery could spell the end of the agony of sensitive teeth. Sky News

Brits enjoy the warmest and sunniest May since records began. May 2018 bucked the trend for gloomy British weather and even with the appearance of a few thunderstorms at the end of the month, could signal an early start to the summer. With over 245 hours of sunshine measured and an average temperature of a balmy 17C, it was the warmest May since the Met Office started recording temperatures in 1910. The Guardian

WW1 soldier’s 103-year-old chocolate up for auction. WW1 hero Richard Bullimore’s collection of medals, letters and even Cadbury’s chocolate could be sold for over £2,000 at auction this week. A Colonies Gift Tin, sent to troops during Christmas 1914 and containing nine Cadbury chocolate bars, is said to be a rare find and joins a Meritorious Service Medal awarded to Richard in 1916. Experts say the chocolate is still edible (if you’re willing to risk it), although would have lost its texture and flavour. Metro

Overuse of antibiotics risks cancer patients’ survival. A study by the NHS has discovered that antibiotics can harm cancer patients’ chances of recovery, by wiping out healthy gut bacteria vital for fighting off cancer cells. Antibiotics are often given to patients who’ve had their immune systems weakened by chemotherapy, but GPs are now being warned to “think really carefully” before prescribing in the future. The discovery comes amid growing worries about the threat of antibiotic resistant bugs. The Telegraph

39% of Brits are uncomfortable sending food back in restaurants. As a nation famed for its politeness, over a third of Brits polled said they dislike pointing out issues when eating out. A survey by YouGov found that of these people, around 50% rarely or never send back food that has a problem, with those that pluck up the courage to complain only highlighting undercooked or completely wrong orders. YouGov

Could the Macarena save your life? The 1993 cheesy-pop hit could help people perform CPR more accurately, according to a study at the University of Barcelona. With 103 beats per minute (BPM), the party song was found to help 74% of participants keep their chest compressions within the effective range of 100 to 120 BPM, compared to 24% of those who did CPR in silence. By singing the tune in their head as a “musical metronome” it was found to be as effective as songs such as ‘Stayin’ Alive’, which was championed by the British Heart Foundation. The Independent

Statistic of the week

£1 in every £3 spent in the UK is made on a Visa card, explaining the scale of the chaos caused by Visa’s Europe-wide system failure on Friday. With a 66% market share of the European payment card industry, Visa is the largest provider of credit and debit cards.

The Independent

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search Latest